derica:

Dean by Lola Flash from the [sur]passing series (2003)
“[sur]passing is […] a series of larger than life size color portraits that probe the impact skin pigmentation plays on black identity and consciousness. Primarily due to the melanin count of their skin, light and dark-skinned blacks opportunities can differ enormously ranging from overt favoritism to extreme alienation. Kobena Mercer coins this process as a “pigmentocracy” - based on skin-tone. This scandalous and often heart wrenching story line dates back to colonial America and it clearly perseveres today.
In [sur]passing the models are shot with a large format camera from towering urban vantage points, highlighting the re-generation of a new inner-city culture, they become divine, larger than the purposely out of focus buildings of the London, New York and South African skylines, in contrast to the sharp, crisp rendering of each subject. The subjects assertively return the gaze, without being confrontational and by hanging the four-foot by five-foot photographs above eye level, the viewer has no choice but to “look up” to these young people posed as if characters from a modern Shakespeare melodrama.So, as the title [sur]passing suggests, these portraits represent a “new generation” - one that is above and beyond “passing”. We represent a fresh pride and strength; where ambiguity and blurred borders create an individuality that elevates consciousness and advances a plethora of complex and positive imagery of [black] people in the Diaspora and all over the world.” - text from artist’s statement

lolaaaa

derica:

Dean by Lola Flash from the [sur]passing series (2003)

[sur]passing is […] a series of larger than life size color portraits that probe the impact skin pigmentation plays on black identity and consciousness. Primarily due to the melanin count of their skin, light and dark-skinned blacks opportunities can differ enormously ranging from overt favoritism to extreme alienation. Kobena Mercer coins this process as a “pigmentocracy” - based on skin-tone. This scandalous and often heart wrenching story line dates back to colonial America and it clearly perseveres today.

In [sur]passing the models are shot with a large format camera from towering urban vantage points, highlighting the re-generation of a new inner-city culture, they become divine, larger than the purposely out of focus buildings of the London, New York and South African skylines, in contrast to the sharp, crisp rendering of each subject. The subjects assertively return the gaze, without being confrontational and by hanging the four-foot by five-foot photographs above eye level, the viewer has no choice but to “look up” to these young people posed as if characters from a modern Shakespeare melodrama.

So, as the title [sur]passing suggests, these portraits represent a “new generation” - one that is above and beyond “passing”. We represent a fresh pride and strength; where ambiguity and blurred borders create an individuality that elevates consciousness and advances a plethora of complex and positive imagery of [black] people in the Diaspora and all over the world.” - text from artist’s statement

lolaaaa

(Source: yagazieemezi)

stfuracists:

grotskylittlebyotch:

Posted on a friend’s FB status. :(

Disparity in the justice system is an important issue that will continue to be ignored by most.

are you freaking kidding me!!!!!!!  WTFFF

stfuracists:

grotskylittlebyotch:

Posted on a friend’s FB status. :(

Disparity in the justice system is an important issue that will continue to be ignored by most.

are you freaking kidding me!!!!!!!  WTFFF

(via cuntofdoom)

derica:

Dean by Lola Flash from the [sur]passing series (2003)
“[sur]passing is […] a series of larger than life size color portraits that probe the impact skin pigmentation plays on black identity and consciousness. Primarily due to the melanin count of their skin, light and dark-skinned blacks opportunities can differ enormously ranging from overt favoritism to extreme alienation. Kobena Mercer coins this process as a “pigmentocracy” - based on skin-tone. This scandalous and often heart wrenching story line dates back to colonial America and it clearly perseveres today.
In [sur]passing the models are shot with a large format camera from towering urban vantage points, highlighting the re-generation of a new inner-city culture, they become divine, larger than the purposely out of focus buildings of the London, New York and South African skylines, in contrast to the sharp, crisp rendering of each subject. The subjects assertively return the gaze, without being confrontational and by hanging the four-foot by five-foot photographs above eye level, the viewer has no choice but to “look up” to these young people posed as if characters from a modern Shakespeare melodrama.So, as the title [sur]passing suggests, these portraits represent a “new generation” - one that is above and beyond “passing”. We represent a fresh pride and strength; where ambiguity and blurred borders create an individuality that elevates consciousness and advances a plethora of complex and positive imagery of [black] people in the Diaspora and all over the world.” - text from artist’s statement

lolaaaa

derica:

Dean by Lola Flash from the [sur]passing series (2003)

[sur]passing is […] a series of larger than life size color portraits that probe the impact skin pigmentation plays on black identity and consciousness. Primarily due to the melanin count of their skin, light and dark-skinned blacks opportunities can differ enormously ranging from overt favoritism to extreme alienation. Kobena Mercer coins this process as a “pigmentocracy” - based on skin-tone. This scandalous and often heart wrenching story line dates back to colonial America and it clearly perseveres today.

In [sur]passing the models are shot with a large format camera from towering urban vantage points, highlighting the re-generation of a new inner-city culture, they become divine, larger than the purposely out of focus buildings of the London, New York and South African skylines, in contrast to the sharp, crisp rendering of each subject. The subjects assertively return the gaze, without being confrontational and by hanging the four-foot by five-foot photographs above eye level, the viewer has no choice but to “look up” to these young people posed as if characters from a modern Shakespeare melodrama.

So, as the title [sur]passing suggests, these portraits represent a “new generation” - one that is above and beyond “passing”. We represent a fresh pride and strength; where ambiguity and blurred borders create an individuality that elevates consciousness and advances a plethora of complex and positive imagery of [black] people in the Diaspora and all over the world.” - text from artist’s statement

lolaaaa

(Source: yagazieemezi)

hmph

(via cuntofdoom)

stfuracists:

grotskylittlebyotch:

Posted on a friend’s FB status. :(

Disparity in the justice system is an important issue that will continue to be ignored by most.

are you freaking kidding me!!!!!!!  WTFFF

stfuracists:

grotskylittlebyotch:

Posted on a friend’s FB status. :(

Disparity in the justice system is an important issue that will continue to be ignored by most.

are you freaking kidding me!!!!!!!  WTFFF

(via cuntofdoom)

The Effects of Gentrification on Food Availability

About:

Founded by two second-generation Dominicanas, NI AQUÍ, NI ALLÁ (NaNa) was initially imagined in 2009 and eventually created in early 2010.

Inspired by the coils of our curly hair, the radiant color of our skin, the trials and tribulations of our immigrant families, the seasonings of our food, the pulsating rhythm of our music and the beauty of this grand earth in which we live in, we created this blog with the hopes of providing a raw and uncensored perspective on life & the overall experience of living between two worlds...neither here, nor there.

Through the publication (and sometimes re-publication) of analytical insights, thought-provoking imagery and personal accounts of our own life journeys, NI AQUÍ, NI ALLÁ aims to promote dialogue and awareness on a range of topics affecting Latinos and other minority groups & communities.

Following:

LA
NPR
crt
yup
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